SHA2 512 bits (a.k.a SHA512) Hash Calculator

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Information about SHA2 Hash function ...

SHA-2 (Secure Hash Algorithm 2) is a set of cryptographic hash functions designed by the United States National Security Agency (NSA). Cryptographic hash functions are mathematical operations run on digital data; by comparing the computed "hash" (the output from execution of the algorithm) to a known and expected hash value, a person can determine the data's integrity. For example, computing the hash of a downloaded file and comparing the result to a previously published hash result can show whether the download has been modified or tampered with. A key aspect of cryptographic hash functions is their collision resistance: nobody should be able to find two different input values that result in the same hash output.

SHA-2 includes significant changes from its predecessor, SHA-1. The SHA-2 family consists of six hash functions with digests (hash values) that are 224, 256, 384 or 512 bits: SHA-224, SHA-256, SHA-384, SHA-512, SHA-512/224, SHA-512/256.

SHA-256 and SHA-512 are novel hash functions computed with 32-bit and 64-bit words, respectively. They use different shift amounts and additive constants, but their structures are otherwise virtually identical, differing only in the number of rounds. SHA-224 and SHA-384 are simply truncated versions of the first two, computed with different initial values. SHA-512/224 and SHA-512/256 are also truncated versions of SHA-512, but the initial values are generated using the method described in Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) PUB 180-4. SHA-2 was published in 2001 by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) a U.S. federal standard (FIPS). The SHA-2 family of algorithms are patented in US patent 6829355. The United States has released the patent under a royalty-free license.

In 2005, an algorithm emerged for finding SHA-1 collisions in about 2,000 times fewer steps than was previously thought possible. In 2017, an example of a SHA-1 collision was published. The security margin left by SHA-1 is weaker than intended, and its use is therefore no longer recommended for applications that depend on collision resistance, such as digital signatures. Although SHA-2 bears some similarity to the SHA-1 algorithm, these attacks have not been successfully extended to SHA-2.

Comparison of SHA functions

In the table below, internal state means the "internal hash sum" after each compression of a data block.

Note that performance will vary not only between algorithms, but also with the specific implementation and hardware used. The OpenSSL tool has a built-in "speed" command that benchmarks the various algorithms on the user's system.

Algorithm and variant Output size
(bits)
Internal state size
(bits)
Block size
(bits)
Max message size
(bits)
Rounds Operations Security bits
(Info)
Example performance
(MiB/s)
First Published
MD5 (as reference) 128 128
(4 × 32)
512 Unlimited 64 And, Xor, Rot, Add (mod 232), Or <64
(collisions found)
335 1992
SHA-0 160 160
(5 × 32)
512 264 − 1 80 And, Xor, Rot, Add (mod 232), Or <80
(collisions found)
- 1993
SHA-1 160 160
(5 × 32)
512 264 − 1 80 <63
(collision found)
192 1995
SHA-2 SHA-224
SHA-256
224
256
256
(8 × 32)
512 264 − 1 64 And, Xor, Rot, Add (mod 232), Or, Shr 112
128
139 2001
SHA-384
SHA-512
SHA-512/224
SHA-512/256
384
512
224
256
512
(8 × 64)
1024 2128 − 1 80 And, Xor, Rot, Add (mod 264), Or, Shr 192
256
112
128
154 2001
SHA-3 SHA3-224
SHA3-256
SHA3-384
SHA3-512
224
256
384
512
1600
(5 × 5 × 64)
1152
1088
832
576
Unlimited 24 And, Xor, Rot, Not 112
128
192
256
- 2015
SHAKE128
SHAKE256
d (arbitrary)
d (arbitrary)
1344
1088
min(d/2, 128)
min(d/2, 256)
- 2015